Persian Program

 

Persian language group programs:

 

Monday 10.00pm to 11.00pm (Global Digital)  

 https://www.facebook.com/RadioChakaame/

 

Tuesday 7.00pm to 8.00pm (Global Digital)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1824694231082543/?hc_ref=SEARCH

 

Wednesday 7.45pm to 8.30pm (98.1 FM)

https://www.facebook.com/manobeshno/

 

Wednesday 9.15pm to 10.00pm (98.1 FM)

 www.facebook.com/HamrahRadio

 

Nowruz Sepcial

Hamrah - Nowruz Special

 

The Persian Group started broadcasting at Radio 4EB from 12 July 1991 and the current committee members are:-

Convenor:                          Maryam Kia

Vice-convenor:                    Jamshid Vazirzadeh

Secretary:                          Sholeh Baghaei

Treasurer:                          Nilia Khoshnevis

Other Committee Member:     Setareh Motiean

 

Persian Language: 

Persian Language, also known as Farsi, is the most widely spoken member of the Iranian branch of the Indo-Iranian languages, a subfamily of the Indo-European languages. It is the language of Iran (formerly Persia) and is also widely spoken in Afghanistan and, in an archaic form, in Tajikistan and the Pamir Mountain region.

Persian is spoken today primarily in Iran and Afghanistan, but was historically a more widely understood language in an area ranging from the Middle East to India. Significant populations of speakers in other Persian Gulf countries (Bahrain, Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, and the United Arab Emirates), as well as large communities in the USA.

 

About Iran: 

Iran is located in southwest Asia and borders the Gulf of Oman, Persian Gulf, and Caspian Sea. Its mountains have helped to shape both the political and the economic history of the country for several centuries. The mountains enclose several broad basins, or plateaus, on which major agricultural and urban settlements are located. Until the 20th century, when major highways and railroads were constructed through the mountains to connect the population centers, these basins tended to be relatively isolated from one another.

Typically, one major town dominated each basin, and there were complex economic relationships between the town and the hundreds of villages that surrounded it. In the higher elevations of the mountains rimming the basins, tribally organized groups practiced transhumance, moving with their herds of sheep and goats between traditionally established summer and winter pastures. There are no major river systems in the country, and historically transportation was by means of caravans that followed routes traversing gaps and passes in the mountains. The mountains also impeded easy access to the Persian Gulf and the Caspian Sea.

With an area of 1,648,000 square kilometres (636,000 sq mi), Iran ranks eighteenth in size among the countries of the world. Iran is about one-fifth the size of the continental United States, or slightly larger than the combined area of the western United States (Arizona, California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, and Idaho).

Iran shares its northern borders with three post-Soviet states: Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Turkmenistan. These borders extend for more than 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi), including nearly 650 kilometres (400 mi) of water along the southern shore of the Caspian Sea. Iran's western borders are with Turkey in the north and Iraq in the south, terminating at the Shatt al-Arab, which Iranians call the Arvand Rud.

The Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman littorals form the entire 1,770 kilometres (1,100 mi) southern border. To the east lie Afghanistan on the north and Pakistan on the south. Iran's diagonal distance from Azerbaijan in the northwest to Sistan and Baluchestan Province in the southeast is approximately 2,333 kilometres (1,450 mi).

 

To listen to the latest broadcast, follow this link;   http://www.4eb.org.au/ondemand